Search within this web site:

 
you are here ::

Geographic Distribution of U.S. Population, Major Migrations of the U.S. Population

Native American peoples, forced migration, minority groups, economic opportunity, World War

The history of America includes three major population movements—one forced and two voluntary. The forced migration involved Native American peoples, most of whom were systematically moved westward and eventually settled onto reservations. The voluntary movements involved millions of people seeking economic advancement and greater freedom. The first of these movements included pioneers who trekked west from the mid-18th century to the turn of the 20th century. The next movement was the great migration of African Americans from the rural South to the cities of the Northeast and Midwest from World War I to the 1960s.

Americans are more restless people than residents of most other countries. They move from house to house, neighborhood to neighborhood, state to state, region to region. Most of the movement has been voluntary as individuals and families sought improved living conditions and economic opportunity. Yet substantial movements have been a result of fear, greed, and racism that denied minority groups the liberties enjoyed by the majority.

deeper links ::


Article key phrases:

Native American peoples, forced migration, minority groups, economic opportunity, World War, liberties, Midwest, pioneers, racism, Northeast, cities, history of America, neighborhood, reservations, century, state, turn, families, house, residents, millions of people, region, individuals, greed

 
 

Search within this web site: