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Independence, Morelos

Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon, Vicente Guerrero, Iturbide, banditry, Mexican independence

The leadership of the popular insurgency next fell to another priest, Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon. Like Hidalgo, he called for racial and social equality in Mexico, in addition to independence, but he was a better military leader. Under Morelos, the rebel forces captured considerable territory, including the city of Acapulco, and declared Mexican independence at the Congress of Chilpancingo in 1813. Royalist forces, however, still controlled Mexico City and most of the viceroyalty. Morelosís army suffered a major defeat in December 1813 at the hands of royalist forces under Agustin de Iturbide, a criollo general. Morelos was captured by royalist forces in 1815 and executed. After Morelos was killed, the revolution continued under Vicente Guerrero, who headed a comparatively small army. The rebels fragmented into small groups, however, often mixing banditry with politics.



Article key phrases:

Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon, Vicente Guerrero, Iturbide, banditry, Mexican independence, viceroyalty, major defeat, social equality, small army, Hidalgo, Agustin, rebels, priest, small groups, revolution, leadership, addition, politics

 
 

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