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Government, Judiciary

constitutional cases, federal judiciary, Federal Court of Canada, English common law, Trial Division

The legal system in Canada is derived from English common law, except in Quebec, which has a civil-law system based on the French civil law, which has been the basis of French law since 1804. The federal judiciary is headed by the Supreme Court of Canada, made up of a chief justice and eight associate judges, three of whom must come from Quebec. It sits in Ottawa and is the final Canadian court of appeal for all civil, criminal, and constitutional cases. The next highest tribunal, the Federal Court of Canada, is divided into a Trial Division and an Appeal Division. It hears a variety of cases, including those involving claims against the federal government. Provincial courts are established by the provincial legislatures and, although the names of the courts are not uniform, each province has a similar three-part court system. Judges of the Supreme Court and the Federal Court and almost all judges of the higher provincial courts are appointed by the federal government.



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constitutional cases, federal judiciary, Federal Court of Canada, English common law, Trial Division, Supreme Court of Canada, chief justice, Ottawa, legal system, province, criminal, federal government, Quebec, names, claims

 
 

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