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Constitution, Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Canadian political system, Canadian Charter of Rights, freedom of conscience, judicial decisions, province of Quebec

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, added to the constitution in 1982, guarantees to citizens fundamental freedoms, such as freedom of conscience and the press. It also guarantees the right to vote and seek election, as well as rights to move throughout Canada, to enjoy security of person, and to combat discrimination. It also specifies the equality of the French and English languages. The charter changed the Canadian political system by enhancing the power of the courts to make or unmake laws through judicial decisions. It also contains the so-called notwithstanding clause, which allows Parliament or the provincial legislatures to designate an act operative even though it might clash with a charter provision. The charter applies uniformly throughout Canada although the province of Quebec has never signed the constitution.



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Canadian political system, Canadian Charter of Rights, freedom of conscience, judicial decisions, province of Quebec, security of person, clause, Parliament, election, discrimination, constitution, equality, courts, laws, French, Canada, power, press

 
 

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