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The People of Oman, Culture

Masqat, Islamic calendar, fine silver jewelry, musical expression, end of Ramadan

Oman is noted for traditional craftsmanship in such areas as shipbuilding and metalworking. Omani craftspeople produce fine silver jewelry as well as handsome ornamental daggers called khanjars, which are part of the well-dressed Omani maleís wardrobe. Traditional architecture reflects Persian and Indian influences. While there is a strong tradition of popular literature and dance, the conservative Ibadi interpretation of Islam has limited musical expression. As in other Muslim countries, the two most important festivals, called Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha, mark the end of Ramadan (the month of fasting) and the conclusion of the hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca) on the Islamic calendar. National Day, November 18, celebrates the birthday of Sultan Qaboos bin Said. The Oman Museum in Masqat has a display of Omani arts, crafts, and architecture. Also in Masqat are the Natural History Museum and, in an old fort, the sultanís Armed Forces Museum.



Article key phrases:

Masqat, Islamic calendar, fine silver jewelry, musical expression, end of Ramadan, Fitr, hajj, Traditional architecture, Natural History Museum, Adha, old fort, Mecca, Eid, month of fasting, Muslim countries, Persian, pilgrimage, shipbuilding, conclusion, metalworking, dance, areas

 
 

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