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Jordan, Land and Resources

Lake Tiberias, Great Rift Valley, Syrian Desert, Jordan Valley, Sea of Galilee

The principal geographical feature of Jordan is an arid plateau that thrusts abruptly upward on the eastern shores of the Jordan River and the Dead Sea, reaching a height of about 610 to 915 m (about 2,000 to 3,000 ft), then sloping gently downward toward the Syrian Desert in the extreme east of the country. The Jordan Valley is in the deep depression of the Great Rift Valley, which is 209 m (686 ft) below sea level in the area of the Sea of Galilee (Lake Tiberias) and 408 m (1,340 ft) below sea level at the Dead Sea, the world’s lowest point. Deep canyons and mountainous outcroppings with elevations of approximately 1,500 m (approximately 4,900 ft) and more characterize the Arabian Plateau in the southern portion of the country. The Jordan River, forming the country’s border with Israel and the West Bank, is the heart of the country’s drainage system.

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Article key phrases:

Lake Tiberias, Great Rift Valley, Syrian Desert, Jordan Valley, Sea of Galilee, eastern shores, Jordan River, Dead Sea, deep depression, West Bank, elevations, southern portion, sea level, Israel, heart, height, area

 
 

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