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Land and Resources, Climate

Syrian Desert, cool summers, continental climate, chief city, Mosul

Most of Iraq has a continental climate with extremes of heat and cold. The mountainous northern portion of the country has cool summers and cold winters, often accompanied by snow. The mean January temperature in Mosul, the chief city in the north, is 7C (44F); the mean July temperature there is 32C (90F). In the lowlands the summers are long and hot, and the winters short and cool. The mean January temperature in Baghdad, which lies in the central lowland part of the country, is 10C (50F); for July it is 35C (95F), and temperatures as high as 51C (123F) have been recorded. In the northeastern highlands rainfall is considerable from October to May, ranging from 305 to 559 mm (12 to 22 in), but farther south, on the central alluvial plain and near the Persian Gulf, precipitation is slight, averaging 150 mm (6 in) annually. The Syrian Desert gets little or no precipitation.



Article key phrases:

Syrian Desert, cool summers, continental climate, chief city, Mosul, Baghdad, lowlands, Persian Gulf, precipitation, cold winters, Iraq, snow, temperatures, country

 
 

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