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Croatia, Land and Resources

parallel mountain ranges, Dinaric Alps, karst terrain, island of Pag, coastal range

The total area of Croatia is 56,510 sq km (21,819 sq mi). The country’s diverse terrain includes flat plains, low mountains, offshore islands, and a coastline, excluding the islands, that extends 1,778 km (1,105 mi). Eastern Croatia, including the historic area of Slavonia, is part of the Pannonian Plain, a low-lying, fertile, agricultural region. In the west, Dalmatia is a narrow, barren strip of land within the Dinaric Alps that slopes down to the Adriatic Sea. The Karst, a barren limestone plateau, dominates the Croatian landscape in some areas; the island of Pag consists almost entirely of karst terrain. The Dinaric Alps consist of several parallel mountain ranges. The highest peak, on the border with Bosnia, is Mount Troglav at 1,913 m (6,276 ft). The coastal range is partially submerged, creating numerous bays, gulfs, inlets, and more than 1,000 offshore islands. The historic area of Istria, a peninsula that stretches out into the Adriatic from Slovenia, lies to the north and west of Dalmatia.

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Article key phrases:

parallel mountain ranges, Dinaric Alps, karst terrain, island of Pag, coastal range, gulfs, Dalmatia, Adriatic Sea, Pannonian, highest peak, peninsula, coastline, inlets, border, Slovenia, Bosnia, west, areas

 
 

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