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History, United States Rule

General Arthur MacArthur, bicameral legislature, William Howard Taft, executive cabinet, executive powers

The United States moved quickly to establish a political administration in the Philippines. In 1901 William Howard Taft, later president of the United States, was appointed the first civilian governor-general, replacing the military governor, General Arthur MacArthur. The governor-general was vested with executive powers and served as head of the Philippine Commission, a body appointed by the U.S. president that served as an executive cabinet and held legislative powers. The commission passed many new laws to set up the fundamentals of a national government, including a judicial system, legal code, civil service, and police force. Elections were held for municipal and provincial governments, and political and bureaucratic positions were opened to Filipinos. In 1907 an elected legislative assembly became the lower house of a bicameral legislature. The appointed Philippine Commission formed the upper house. In 1916 an elected senate replaced the commission. Monetary, military, and foreign policies were controlled by the U.S. Congress and president. In all other matters, bills passed by the new legislature became law upon approval by the governor-general.

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General Arthur MacArthur, bicameral legislature, William Howard Taft, executive cabinet, executive powers, military governor, legislative powers, foreign policies, upper house, judicial system, civil service, new laws, police force, national government, lower house, legal code, Elections, Filipinos, bills, Philippines, approval, fundamentals, Congress, matters, head, United States, body

 
 

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