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Land and Resources, Rivers and Lakes

Lake Kenyir, Rajang, Kinabatangan, dam projects, West Malaysia

East Malaysia contains the country’s two longest rivers: the Rajang in Sarawak and the Kinabatangan in Sabah. They are each 560 km (350 mi) long and navigable for part of their courses. Also important is the 400-km (250-mi) long Baram River in Sarawak. Peninsular Malaysia’s longest rivers include the Pahang (470 km/290 mi long), the Kelantan (about 400 km/about 250 mi long), and the Perak (about 240 km/about 150 mi long), all of which are navigable for most of their courses. Most of Malaysia’s rivers have steep descents, especially those in Sarawak. Consequently, these rivers have immense hydroelectric potential, which the country is in the process of developing. Most of Malaysia’s lakes were created by dam projects. The largest of these lakes are Temengor in the state of Perak, and Kenyir in the state of Terengganu; Lake Kenyir, which is surrounded by dense vegetation and borders on a national park, is being developed for ecotourism. The country’s largest natural lake is the Bera in West Malaysia.



Article key phrases:

Lake Kenyir, Rajang, Kinabatangan, dam projects, West Malaysia, East Malaysia, Sabah, Bera, Kelantan, national park, Pahang, ecotourism, Sarawak, borders, courses, process

 
 

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