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Government, International Organizations

Nonaligned Movement, loose association, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Asian Development Bank

In the 1980s and 1990s Indonesia played a more active role in international affairs than it had in the past. Indonesia was a founding member of the Nonaligned Movement (NAM), a loose association begun in 1961 of countries that were not specifically allied with the power blocs led by either the United States or the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). Indonesia was also, in 1967, a founding member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), which plays a central role in the country’s foreign policy. Indonesia is a member of the United Nations (UN) and several of its agencies, including the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the Asian Development Bank. It is also one of the founding members of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, which was established in 1989.



Article key phrases:

Nonaligned Movement, loose association, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Asian Development Bank, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, APEC, International Monetary Fund, International Bank, IMF, World Bank, USSR, ASEAN, founding members, international affairs, Reconstruction, United Nations, active role, countries, agencies, past, United States, forum, central role, NAM

 
 

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