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Arts and Culture, Museums

National Museum of Cambodia, torture instruments, stone images, Museum of Genocide, plastic arts

The Khmer Rouge closed cultural institutions during their rule, but many were reopened in the 1980s. The National Museum of Cambodia in Phnom Penh is Cambodiaís largest museum, with objects dating from prehistory to the 18th century. The museum houses the largest collection of Khmer art in the world and is renowned for its Angkor-era bronze and stone images. The museumís exhibits also include ceramics, wooden ornaments, musical instruments, weaving looms, lacquer, and silver. The University of Fine Arts in Phnom Penh is responsible for preserving Khmer culture. It has reopened with departments in music, dance, painting, architecture, and the plastic arts.

The Tuol Sleng Museum (Museum of Genocide), also in Phnom Penh, is a former high school that was used by the Khmer Rouge as a killing center and since then has been converted into a museum. Displays focus on the atrocities of the Khmer Rouge and include torture instruments and photographs of those killed.



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National Museum of Cambodia, torture instruments, stone images, Museum of Genocide, plastic arts, weaving looms, Khmer Rouge, wooden ornaments, atrocities, Phnom Penh, lacquer, musical instruments, high school, cultural institutions, ceramics, painting, rule, objects, dance, architecture, photographs, focus, world, departments

 
 

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