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Arts, Art and Architecture

Kasubi Tombs, large murals, Makerere University, Ugandans, significant historical events

Much traditional art, including drums, amulets, and shields, is related to the different royal courts and ceremonies of precolonial monarchs. The Kasubi Tombs, the burial place for the last three Buganda kabakas (kings), are located in Kampala in a magnificent traditional structure made of woven reeds. Modern Ugandan painters and sculptors, using Western techniques, have used their art to mark significant historical events and celebrate local culture. Most of Uganda’s artists who use Western techniques studied in the Margaret Trowell School of Fine Art in Makerere University, although several, such as Francis Nnaggenda, were trained in Europe or the United States. Nnaggenda’s massive sculptures celebrate the triumph of the human spirit and the redeeming power of love. His sculpture War Victim (1986), exhibited at Makerere University, commemorates the suffering borne by Ugandans in the 1970s and 1980s. Ignatius Sserulyo is a painter who interprets traditional myths and indigenous activities, such as farming, on large murals.



Article key phrases:

Kasubi Tombs, large murals, Makerere University, Ugandans, significant historical events, traditional art, amulets, burial place, human spirit, sculptors, Kampala, shields, triumph, drums, farming, kings, local culture, Europe, suffering, United States

 
 

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