Search within this web site:

 
you are here ::

History, Independence

Abdou Diouf, multiparty system, constitutional amendment, presidential elections, new constitution

In 1958 Senegal was granted almost complete internal autonomy, and in June 1960 it became fully independent as part of the Mali Federation, which joined Senegal with the Sudanese Republic (now Mali). On August 20, 1960, Senegal withdrew from the federation and became a separate republic. Senghor was elected the first president; he was reelected in 1963, 1968, 1973, and 1978. Following an alleged coup d’etat attempt in 1962 by Prime Minister Mamadou Dia, the powers of the president were greatly increased in a new constitution that went into effect in 1963. Under Senghor’s regime the country made progress in diversifying its economy, but income from foreign sales of peanuts remained crucial. At times, notably in 1968 and 1973, students staged large demonstrations to protest the concentration of power in Senghor’s hands. A multiparty system was established by constitutional amendment in 1976, and at the beginning of 1981 Senghor stepped down and named Abdou Diouf, who had been prime minister since 1970, as his successor. After adopting a popular anticorruption program, Diouf won 1983 presidential elections by a wide margin.



Article key phrases:

Abdou Diouf, multiparty system, constitutional amendment, presidential elections, new constitution, Senegal, powers, wide margin, income, successor, economy, progress, country, students, beginning, effect, times

 
 

Search within this web site: