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History, Recent Developments

Qaddafi, International Court of Justice, Scottish law, Lockerbie, terrorist attacks

In 1994 the International Court of Justice ruled that Chad had sovereignty over the Aozou Strip, and Libya accepted the ruling without protest. In 1999 Libya agreed to hand over the two suspects in the 1988 bombing over Lockerbie to stand trial in The Netherlands under Scottish law. Upon delivery of the suspects for transport to The Netherlands, the United Nations suspended sanctions against Libya.

The conviction of one of the Lockerbie suspects and the acquittal of the other failed to satisfy the Lockerbie families, who had become a strong lobbying group in the United States, and U.S. sanctions against Libya were extended in 2001. However, relations with the United States seemed to be thawing, and signs pointed toward Libya’s readiness to end its decades of political isolation. Qaddafi referred to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States as “horrific,” and Libya subsequently shared sensitive intelligence about terrorist networks with the United States.



Article key phrases:

Qaddafi, International Court of Justice, Scottish law, Lockerbie, terrorist attacks, sovereignty, Libya, sanctions, bombing, suspects, conviction, Chad, United Nations, Netherlands, signs, acquittal, trial, transport, relations, United States

 
 

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