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Guinea, Government

universal adult suffrage, unicameral legislature, military coup, popular vote, universal suffrage

Under the 1982 constitution, a president, elected by universal suffrage to a seven-year term, was chief of state, the government, and the armed forces. The unicameral National Assembly, consisting of 210 members, was chosen by popular vote from a single slate of candidates from the country’s sole political party, the Democratic Party of Guinea. After a military coup in April 1984, this party was outlawed, the constitution suspended, and the parliament dissolved. Guinea was then ruled by a president as head of the 17-member Military Committee for National Rectification. In 1990 a new constitution was approved in a national referendum. It authorized a transitional government to oversee the change to a two-party, civilian system with a unicameral legislature of 114 seats and universal adult suffrage. In 1992 amendments authorized an unlimited number of political parties. Presidential elections were held late in 1993; legislative elections, after being postponed several times, took place in 1995.



Article key phrases:

universal adult suffrage, unicameral legislature, military coup, popular vote, universal suffrage, legislative elections, transitional government, national referendum, Presidential elections, new constitution, parliament, amendments, chief of state, seats, year term, armed forces, head, place, change, members, times

 
 

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