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The People of Ghana, Education

adult literacy rate, Cape Coast, Christian missionaries, Kumasi, University of Ghana

Christian missionaries introduced Western-style education to Ghana in the 18th century. Although some schools are still affiliated with religious groups, the state is now the main provider of education. In 1996, 20 percent of the national budget was spent on education. Primary education is free and compulsory. In 1996, 76 percent of primary school-aged children attended primary school. Attendance at the secondary school level was 31 percent and 1.4 percent at the university level. A greater percentage of boys attended school than girls, the gap widening above the primary school level. However, the disparity in attendance by gender was not due to any state policy. Ghana’s educational system is open to all. The adult literacy rate in 2001 was recorded at 91.5 percent, with male literacy at 93.9 and female literacy at 89.1. The University of Ghana, at Legon (near Accra), was Ghana’s first university, established in 1948. There are three other universities in the country, located at Cape Coast, Kumasi, and Tamale, and numerous teacher training colleges and vocational institutions.



Article key phrases:

adult literacy rate, Cape Coast, Christian missionaries, Kumasi, University of Ghana, national budget, Legon, female literacy, Tamale, Accra, state policy, religious groups, Primary education, disparity, compulsory, gap, Attendance, universities, schools, gender, century, university level, country, girls

 
 

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