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Population, Education

adult literacy rate, civil conflict, Luanda, educational reforms, national independence

In principle, education is free and compulsory for children between the ages of 7 and 15. However, under colonial rule education was sporadic and not well supported, and the adult literacy rate was only 15 percent at independence. With national independence came educational reforms, including instruction in indigenous languages and a national literacy campaign. Under these changes, primary school enrollment jumped from about 300,000 in 1973 to 1,342,116 in the 1998-1999 school year. Higher education was also emphasized; enrollment reached 6,300, with most of those students attending Angola’s only university, Agostinho Neto University (1963) in Luanda. By 1990 the literacy rate had been increased to 42 percent. The rate for men (56 percent) has been consistently higher than that for women. A lack of teachers and effects of the long-running civil conflict have hindered further educational gains.



Article key phrases:

adult literacy rate, civil conflict, Luanda, educational reforms, national independence, indigenous languages, compulsory, Higher education, principle, percent, instruction, students, school year, women, children, changes, effects

 
 

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